Bump Bounce and Roll: Trying to start a trial.

  Photo:  John, Anne and I making the best of the trial date continuance by eating lunch at the space needle.

Photo:  John, Anne and I making the best of the trial date continuance by eating lunch at the space needle.

On The Good Wife or Drop Dead Diva, the attorneys get the cases in the morning.  Try them in the afternoon.

In the real world the case is filed and then has to wait a year and a half for a trial date.

If it survives for that long, there is a fifty-fifty chance  the defense will ask the judge for (and get) a continuance.  Delay is a friend of the defense: Deny. Defend.  Delay.

So now the case has been waiting for a couple years.  The judge says - no more continuances.

As the trial date approaches, the office starts buzzing.  Call all witnesses.  Coordinate schedules.  Make sure everything will fit together as perfectly as possible.  Because judges don't like even ten minutes of down time.

Just a few days away and we get the call from the bailiff.  Sorry.  Judge has a conflict.  Your case is getting brokered.  You are on standby.

Gaaaaaaaaaaaaah.

Frustrated.  But not surprised.

Office buzzes again.  Calls all witnesses.  They are unhappy.  Some will now be unable to attend.  They had already scheduled time off with their bosses.  Or they had travel plans.  Or they are doctors and have 50 patients booked solid every day.

The witnesses all want to know what the next date will be.  We can't tell them.  The court hasn't told us yet.

We wait until we get the call.  Case will start just one day late.  Just. This still plays havoc with everyone's schedules.

The defense lawyer says they won't agree to one day late.  Their witness isn't available.  They bring a motion to continue the case again.

Gaaaaaaaaaaaaah.

Deal is worked out.  Case is continued for a month.

All the witnesses are notified.  All the schedules are reworked.  Plans made.

And we all cross our fingers and hope that this time it will actually go out on time.